Ryzodeg FlexTouch

Ryzodeg FlexTouch Patient Counseling Information

Manufacturer:

Novo Nordisk

Distributor:

DKSH
Full Prescribing Info
Patient Counseling Information
Instructions for the patient on how to use Ryzodeg 100 units/ml solution for injection in pre-filled pen (FlexTouch): Please read these instructions carefully before using your FlexTouch pre-filled pen.
If you do not follow the instructions carefully, you may get too little or too much insulin, which can lead to too high or too low blood sugar level.
Do not use the pen without proper training from your doctor or nurse.
Start by checking your pen to make sure that it contains Ryzodeg 100 units/ml, then look at the steps as follows to get to know the different parts of your pen and needle.
If you are blind or have poor eyesight and cannot read the dose counter on the pen, do not use this pen without help. Get help from a person with good eyesight who is trained to use the FlexTouch pre-filled pen.
Your pen is a pre-filled dial-a-dose insulin pen containing 300 units of insulin. You can select a maximum of 80 units per dose, in steps of 1 unit. Your pen is designed to be used with NovoTwist or NovoFine single-use disposable needles up to a length of 8 mm. Needles are not included in the pack.
Important information: Pay special attention to these notes as they are important for correct use of the pen.
1. Prepare your pen: A. Check the name and strength on the label of your pen, to make sure that it contains Ryzodeg 100 units/ml. This is especially important if you take more than one type of insulin. If you take a wrong type of insulin, your blood sugar level may get too high or too low.
 Pull off the pen cap.
B. Check that the insulin in your pen is clear and colourless. Look through the insulin window. If the insulin looks cloudy, do not use the pen.
C. Take a new needle and tear off the paper tab.
D. Push the needle straight onto the pen. Turn until it is on tight.
E. Pull off the outer needle cap and keep it for later. You will need it after the injection, to correctly remove the needle from the pen.
F. Pull off the inner needle cap and throw it away. If you try to put it back on, you may accidentally stick yourself with the needle.
A drop of insulin may appear at the needle tip. This is normal, but you must still check the insulin flow.
Always use a new needle for each injection.
This reduces the risk of contamination, infection, leakage of insulin, blocked needles and inaccurate dosing.
Never use a bent or damaged needle.
2. Check the insulin flow: Always check the insulin flow before you start. This helps you to ensure that you get your full insulin dose.
A. Turn the dose selector to select 2 units. Make sure the dose counter shows 2.
B. Hold the pen with the needle pointing up.
Tap the top of the pen gently a few times to let any air bubbles rise to the top.
C. Press and hold in the dose button until the dose counter returns to 0.
The 0 must line up with the dose pointer.
A drop of insulin should appear at the needle tip.
A small air bubble may remain at the needle tip, but it will not be injected.
If no drop appears, repeat steps 2A to 2C up to 6 times. If there is still no drop, change the needle and repeat steps 2A to 2C once more.
If a drop of insulin still does not appear, dispose of the pen and use a new one.
Always make sure that a drop appears at the needle tip before you inject. This makes sure that the insulin flows.
If no drop appears, you will not inject any insulin, even though the dose counter may move.
This may indicate a blocked or damaged needle.
Always check the flow before you inject. If you do not check the flow, you may get too little insulin or no insulin at all. This may lead to too high blood sugar level.
3. Select your dose: A. Make sure the dose counter shows 0 before you start.
The 0 must line up with the dose pointer.
Turn the dose selector to select the dose you need, as directed by your doctor or nurse.
If you select a wrong dose, you can turn the dose selector forwards or backwards to the correct dose.
The pen can dial up to a maximum of 80 units.
The dose selector changes the number of units. Only the dose counter and dose pointer will show how many units you select per dose.
You can select up to 80 units per dose. When your pen contains less than 80 units, the dose counter stops at the number of units left.
The dose selector clicks differently when turned forwards, backwards or past the number of units left. Do not count the pen clicks.
Always use the dose counter and the dose pointer to see how many units you have selected before injecting the insulin.
Do not count the pen clicks. If you select and inject the wrong dose, your blood sugar level may get too high or too low. Do not use the insulin scale, it only shows approximately how much insulin is left in your pen.
4. Inject your dose: A. Insert the needle into your skin as your doctor or nurse has shown you.
Make sure you can see the dose counter.
Do not touch the dose counter with your fingers. This could interrupt the injection.
Press and hold down the dose button until the dose counter returns to 0.
The 0 must line up with the dose pointer.
You may then hear or feel a click.
Leave the needle under the skin for at least 6 seconds to make sure you get your full dose.
B. Pull the needle and pen straight up from your skin.
If blood appears at the injection site, press lightly with a cotton swab. Do not rub the area.
You may see a drop of insulin at the needle tip after injecting. This is normal and does not affect your dose.
Always watch the dose counter to know how many units you inject.
The dose counter will show the exact number of units. Do not count the pen clicks.
Hold the dose button down until the dose counter returns to 0 after the injection. If the dose counter stops before it returns to 0, the full dose has not been delivered, which may result in too high blood sugar level.
5. After your injection: A. Lead the needle tip into the outer needle cap on a flat surface without touching the needle or the outer cap.
B. Once the needle is covered, carefully push the outer needle cap completely on.
Unscrew the needle and dispose of it carefully.
C. Put the pen cap on your pen after each use to protect the insulin from light.
Always dispose of the needle after each injection. This reduces the risk of contamination, infection, leakage of insulin, blocked needles and inaccurate dosing. If the needle is blocked, you will not inject any insulin.
When the pen is empty, throw it away without a needle on as instructed by your doctor, nurse, pharmacist or local authorities.
Never try to put the inner needle cap back on the needle. You may stick yourself with the needle.
Always remove the needle after each injection and store your pen without the needle attached. This reduces the risk of contamination, infection, leakage of insulin, blocked needles and inaccurate dosing.
6. How much insulin is left: A. The insulin scale shows you approximately how much insulin is left in your pen.
B. To see precisely how much insulin is left, use the dose counter.
Turn the dose selector until the dose counter stops. If it shows 80, at least 80 units are left in your pen.
If it shows less than 80, the number shown is the number of units left in your pen. Turn the dose selector back until the dose counter shows 0.
If you need more insulin than the units left in your pen, you can split your dose between two pens.
Be very careful to calculate correctly if splitting your dose.
If in doubt, take the full dose with a new pen. If you split the dose wrong, you will inject too little or too much insulin, which can lead to too high or too low blood sugar level.
Further important information: Always keep your pen with you.
Always carry an extra pen and new needles with you, in case of loss or damage.
Always keep your pen and needles out of sight and reach of others, especially children.
Never share your pen or your needles with other people. It might lead to cross-infection.
Never share your pen with other people. Your medicine might be harmful to their health.
Caregivers must be very careful when handling used needles - to reduce the risk of needle injury and cross-infection.
Caring for your pen: Treat your pen with care. Rough handling or misuse may cause inaccurate dosing, which can lead to too high or too low blood sugar level.
Do not leave the pen in a car or other place where it can get too hot or too cold.
Do not expose your pen to dust, dirt or liquid.
Do not wash, soak or lubricate your pen. If necessary, clean it with mild detergent on a moistened cloth.
Do not drop your pen or knock it against hard surfaces.
If you drop it or suspect a problem, attach a new needle and check the insulin flow before you inject.
Do not try to refill your pen. Once empty, it must be disposed of.
Do not try to repair your pen or pull it apart.
Register or sign in to continue
Asia's one-stop resource for medical news, clinical reference and education
Sign up for free
Already a member? Sign in